A Season for Everything

It was the springtime. We were house hunting. We knew our budget, the type of house and location we were looking for. We walked into the house one Sunday afternoon. It was outdated. The house had a tired kitchen, ugly wallpaper, faded carpet, and outdated bathrooms. In fact, the entire house reeked of the 80’s.

But we fell in love with the house. The location was private and beautiful. The neighborhood was quiet and small. We made an offer. A lowball offer. After all, we would have to update the entire house unless we wanted the vintage look. We didn’t.

The offer was rejected. Our realtor suggested we wait three weeks. If no offer was received by then, the owner would reduce the price. Low and behold, that is what happened. We made another offer. They countered. Finally, we agreed upon a price. The house was ours.

The previous owner must have loved bearded irises. The south side of the house was planted with multiple colors of the flower. The iris is a flower I’ve never been fond of. I knew she had to love irises, because she had a huge bouquet of them sitting on the dining room table when we toured the house. It was iris season. I’m sure she was very proud of her iris bed. What she didn’t know was that I had plans to get rid of every last iris.

I imagine the former owner had most likely spent many hours in her iris bed. Planting. Weeding. Pruning. Deadheading. Cutting the fresh blooms to enjoy indoors.

But once she sold the house, all bets were off for that iris bed. I had plans, and they didn’t include irises. What she didn’t know was that I loved peonies, roses and zinnias. Instead of having all purple flowers, I wanted to see some pinks and reds and oranges. Even yellow.

I waited a couple of years before I decided it was time to make some changes. The flower bed was bigger than I realized, so I only managed to dig up one third of the bulbs the first fall. The next year, I removed another third of the bulbs. Finally, this year I’ve dug out the remaining third of the flowerbed.

Now I can begin the real work of making the flowerbed mine.


We don’t remember what happened in the past, and in future generations, no one will remember what we are doing now. Ecclesiastes 1:11


It’s easy to be offended when someone comes along and makes changes to what you once held dear. Times change. Interests are updated. People grow.  What was once new is now old, and what was old is now new again.  

Change can be liberating or exhausting.  Depending on what side of the equation you’re on, someone else’s decision to change may just be the motivation to get you out of your comfort zone.  It may be the nudge to actually move on when moving on wasn’t on your mind.

Letting go of old and beloved flowers or habits or traditions or jobs can take your breath away, or it can bring new life. It all depends on the attitude of
adjustment.  It doesn’t have to be offensive.

I came to hate all my hard work here on earth, for I must leave to others everything I have earned. And who can tell whether my successors will be wise or foolish? Yet they will control everything I have gained by my skill and hard work under the sun. How meaningless!  So I gave up in despair, questioning the value of all my hard work in this world.  Some people work wisely with knowledge and skill, then must leave the fruit of their efforts to someone who hasn’t worked for it. This, too, is meaningless, a great tragedy.  Ecclesiastes 2:18-21 

The flowerbed that once held colorful bearded irises will produce something different in the spring.  White peonies.  Pink roses.  Orange Chinese lanterns.  The possibilities are endless.  Each season, the flowerbed that only held irises will now shine with new colors and blooms.  It will have a new look.  A future owner will never know irises once grew in the space.  But then again, they may remove all my hard work and start a fresh new space.  It is expected.  It is accepted.  There are times when change needs to occur in order for stagnation to be replaced by fresh newness.

There is a time and a season for everything.  Adjusting to change is hard, especially when it isn’t an expected or desired change.  Newness can bring new life and new opportunities that one would never have experienced if the change hadn’t occurred.  

It isn’t easy to embrace change, but moving on to new pastures can be refreshing and invigorating.  Otherwise, change can cause an inner death and allow a root of bitterness to grow.  Accept change.  Allow the newness of discomfort to challenge and renew your spirit.  New life blooms ahead in the new season.

For everything there is a season, a time for every activity under heaven. Ecclesiastes 3:1 

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Inside Out

Over the past nine years, I have changed my eating habits. I started by eating clean, so I removed processed foods, white sugar, white flour and pop. As the years progressed, my eating habits changed even further. I removed gluten, grains and soy. I’ve even removed dairy, eggs, corn and peanuts. I eat low fat.

Some may ask what’s left to eat. Fruits and vegetables, of course. I drink a big fruit smoothie for breakfast. I eat plenty of fruits and vegetables throughout the day. I eat potatoes like they’re going out of style. I’ll eat a salad and steamed veggies at lunch. I throw in some chicken or beef with my salad and steamed veggies at dinner. Occasionally, I’ll throw in a chocolate treat as a treat.

I’ve recently begun juicing. I’ll drink a big glass of celery juice early in the morning. I’ve read that it’s supposed to heal your insides. It’s supposed to heal your body of many unknown diseases and ailments. So I’m drinking it. To be honest, I’ve never been a big fan of eating celery. But drinking it? Well, it tastes like liquid celery.

Over the weeks and months I’ve been drinking it, I’ve become accustomed to the flavor. It’s still not my favorite, but it’s tolerable. I’m waiting to see if it does its internal magic. Some say the healing could take months or years. I’m still waiting. I’m not sure what healing I need, but I sure would like to get rid of some aches and pains, plus a few extra pounds.

There are days when I do eat eggs or dairy or gluten. I thoroughly enjoyed a cheeseburger lettuce wrap and fries the other day. I can’t say I’m perfect at eating this way, but I do my best. I lapse from time to time. I tell myself that eating the foods on my “NO” list won’t kill me, so it’s ok. But eating them may prolong or slow down any internal healing.


He personally carried our sins in his body on the cross so that we can be dead to sin and live for what is right. By his wounds you are healed. 1 Peter 2:24


I think of my soul. My spiritual life. As a person who has made the decision to be a Christian, my life is different. I need to heal from the inside out in order to be presentable to God on the day of judgment.

I’ve learned that it’s not about all the do’s and don’ts of being a Christian that make me closer to God. I’ve discovered that as a believer, I must change certain behaviors and attitudes. I’ve found that in order to heal from the inside out as a believer, I must walk the walk of Christ. I’ve learned that my life must match up to His teachings. I must lose my pride and selfish ways in order to follow and obey my Savior.

Oh. There are certain things I don’t do. There are certain words I don’t say. There are certain events I choose not to participate in. There are lines I don’t cross. But there are also certain activities that I make sure to join. There are habits I must develop in order to make Jesus Christ my priority.

I attend church. I am involved in a Bible study. I share a portion of my income to build God’s kingdom. I pray. I read the Bible. I have close friends who are also followers of Christ. I have found that doing those things isn’t enough, though.

I’ve learned that it’s not so much the giving up of things, but it’s the giving in to obedience. Obeying what the Healer says. Going where he says go. Staying when he says stay. Listening to the words he says. Saying the words he provides. Acting out his love to those who need it most.

I must work to heal my insides of judging others. I must work to rid myself of gossip. I must remove anything in my life that takes priority over my relationship with Christ. This healing will take a lifetime. Daily I learn more about my weaknesses and failures as I walk this journey. But I don’t walk alone. I am walking side by side with the Healer.

I find that as I heal, I sometimes fall back into my old ways. I will mistreat someone. I will develop a bad attitude. I will gossip. I will think more highly of myself than I do of others. This healing is a lifelong process.

This healing from the inside out isn’t really about me. It’s about who is healing me. The one who died to save me and forgive my sins. My healing will make this unworthy soul worthy to stand in his presence for eternity.

I also must constantly remind myself that everyone I meet is in a struggle for spiritual survival, whether they know it or not. I must view others as Christ does — a soul in need of salvation. When I look at others, I must have concern for them, because they too will stand in judgment for their eternal destiny. They too require healing from the inside out. I carry a message that provides healing not only for me, but for everyone I meet.